World’s fastest camera captures 70 trillion frames per second

Using ultrafast laser pulses, a new camera system can shoot at up to 70 trillion frames per second

The best phone cameras can record slow motion with under 1,000 frames per second. Commercial rigs generally shoot with several thousand. But that all absolutely pales in comparison to the new record holder for the world’s fastest camera, boasting a mind-boggling rate of 70 trillion frames per second. That’s fast enough to capture light waves in movement.

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Huge advance as photon-sensing 3D camera crosses the megapixel mark

Researchers have demonstrated a new depth-sensing 3D camera that can detect single photons of light at megapixel resolution and 24,000 frames per second, both record highs. Its incredible capabilities could power next-generation vision systems for auto… Continue reading Huge advance as photon-sensing 3D camera crosses the megapixel mark

Drone plays dodgeball to demo fast new obstacle detection system

Obstacle avoidance is a crucial piece of technology for drones, but commercially-available systems just aren’t fast enough for some situations. Now, engineers at the University of Zurich have developed a new system that gives drones such fast reflexes … Continue reading Drone plays dodgeball to demo fast new obstacle detection system

Modern Mass Surveillance: Identify, Correlate, Discriminate

Communities across the United States are starting to ban facial recognition technologies. In May of last year, San Francisco banned facial recognition; the neighboring city of Oakland soon followed, as did Somerville and Brookline in Massachusetts (a s… Continue reading Modern Mass Surveillance: Identify, Correlate, Discriminate

Modern Mass Surveillance: Identify, Correlate, Discriminate

Communities across the United States are starting to ban facial recognition technologies. In May of last year, San Francisco banned facial recognition; the neighboring city of Oakland soon followed, as did Somerville and Brookline in Massachusetts (a statewide ban may follow). In December, San Diego suspended a facial recognition program in advance of a new statewide law, which declared it… Continue reading Modern Mass Surveillance: Identify, Correlate, Discriminate

Police Surveillance Tools from Special Services Group

Special Services Group, a company that sells surveillance tools to the FBI, DEA, ICE, and other US government agencies, has had its secret sales brochure published. Motherboard received the brochure as part of a FOIA request to the Irvine Police Department in California. "The Tombstone Cam is our newest video concealment offering the ability to conduct remote surveillance operations from… Continue reading Police Surveillance Tools from Special Services Group

Police Surveillance Tools from Special Services Group

Special Services Group, a company that sells surveillance tools to the FBI, DEA, ICE, and other US government agencies, has had its secret sales brochure published. Motherboard received the brochure as part of a FOIA request to the Irvine Police Depart… Continue reading Police Surveillance Tools from Special Services Group

Robotic Skin Sees When (and How) You’re Touching It

Cameras are getting less and less conspicuous. Now they’re hiding under the skin of robots.

A team of researchers from ETH Zurich in Switzerland have recently created a multi-camera optical tactile sensor that is able to monitor the space around it based on contact force distribution. The sensor uses a …read more

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Camera obscura: Researchers say weak protocols are Achilles’ heel of surveillance cameras

In a world of hackable things, protocols in surveillance cameras sometimes get overlooked. The cameras used in commercial buildings aren’t necessarily a priority for researchers looking for the next big intrusion, and the devices are often seen as one-dimensional targets that only yield the data they collect. But that misses the point of how a camera can be a gateway to other devices in a building. Hacking an internet-connected camera could give an attacker a pathway to a device controlling physical access to a facility, for example. That concern prompted researchers at Forescout Technologies to dissect surveillance cameras in their test lab in the Netherlands. What they found were widely used cameras using weak communication protocols to transmit data over unencrypted channels. The researchers were able to carry out a “man-in-the-middle attack,” which intercepts and manipulates data, to replace footage recorded by the camera with their own. Altering security footage at an airport, for example, could be […]

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