Study suggests red netting is best at protecting crops from insects

When it comes to protecting crops via insect-blocking netting, you may think that the size of the holes in that netting is the most important factor. According to new research, however, the color of red netting makes an even bigger difference in effect… Continue reading Study suggests red netting is best at protecting crops from insects

Scientists grow beef cells in rice to make new protein-rich space food

In a move that will make some stomachs growl and others turn, Korean scientists have taken muscle and fat stem cells from cows and transplanted them into grains of rice. The end result is a new, high-protein food that should be cheap, environmentally f… Continue reading Scientists grow beef cells in rice to make new protein-rich space food

New type of cherry tomato self-dries while still on the vine

Much as we may like sun-dried tomatoes, they’re typically pretreated with sulfur dioxide or salt before the drying process, which may actually be carried out in an oven. By contrast, a new type of cherry tomato has been selectively bred to dry right on… Continue reading New type of cherry tomato self-dries while still on the vine

Nontoxic spray could protect vineyards from the taint of wildfire smoke

When vineyards are exposed to wildfire smoke, the grapes may absorb compounds which end up detracting from the flavor of the wine. A new spray-on grape coating could help, however, keeping wines from being described as possessing “a hint of burning for… Continue reading Nontoxic spray could protect vineyards from the taint of wildfire smoke

Coal-to-protein livestock feed uses 1/1000th as much land as farming

Chinese scientists have developed a cost-effective method of converting coal into protein, which they say could feed livestock much more efficiently than natural plants, while using a tiny fraction of the land.Continue ReadingCategory: ScienceTags: Agr… Continue reading Coal-to-protein livestock feed uses 1/1000th as much land as farming

Scientists alter rice plant microbiome for better resistance to pathogens

The “microbiome” is the unique population of microorganisms found in and on every plant and animal. Scientists have now genetically altered that population in rice plants, making them more resistant to harmful bacteria. The technology could one day red… Continue reading Scientists alter rice plant microbiome for better resistance to pathogens

Electrically conductive eSoil boosts plant growth via zaps to the roots

While hydroponic farms do allow a lot of crop plants to be grown in a relatively small space, they would certainly be a better alternative to traditional farms if those plants grew faster. That could soon be the case, thanks to the development of elect… Continue reading Electrically conductive eSoil boosts plant growth via zaps to the roots

Experimental system uses microwaves to cook crop pests in soil

Just like any other organisms, crop-destroying soil microbes die if they get too hot. With that fact in mind, scientists have developed a new system in which soil-heating microwaves are used to kill such pests. The technology could one day replace the … Continue reading Experimental system uses microwaves to cook crop pests in soil

Airdropped spinning-seed-inspired sensors could monitor soil moisture

Trees such as maples have “fruits” known as samaras, which consist of a seed joined to a papery wing. Scientists have now created artificial samaras, which could be used to quickly and easily monitor soil temperature from the air.Continue ReadingCatego… Continue reading Airdropped spinning-seed-inspired sensors could monitor soil moisture

Could “armored” bacteria replace chemical fertilizers?

Conventional chemical fertilizers aren’t among the most eco-friendly substances in the world, which is one reason why some farmers are exploring the use of beneficial bacteria as an alternative. A new coating technology could make such microbes more wi… Continue reading Could “armored” bacteria replace chemical fertilizers?