Reverse Engineering the SEGA Mega Drive

With the widespread adoption of emulators, almost anyone can start playing video games from bygone eras. Some systems are even capable of supporting homebrew games, with several having active communities …read more Continue reading Reverse Engineering the SEGA Mega Drive

A DIY Biometric Device with Some Security Considerations

Comfortable, wearable packaging for biometric device for monitoring physiological data and pushing the data to the cloud

Biohacking projects are not new to Hackaday and it’s certainly a genre that really piques our interest. Our latest biohacking device comes courtesy of [Manivannan] who brings his flavor of …read more Continue reading A DIY Biometric Device with Some Security Considerations

Arduino Wannabe Should Have Used a 555. Oh Wait, It Does.

It’s a little known secret that when the Hackaday writers gather in their secret underground bunker to work on our plans for world domination, we often take breaks to play our version of the corporate “Buzzword Bingo”, where paradigms are …read more

Continue reading Arduino Wannabe Should Have Used a 555. Oh Wait, It Does.

Pause Your Tunes When it is Time to Listen Up!

“Sorry. I had music playing. Would you say that again?” If we had a money-unit every time someone tried talking to us while we were wearing headphones, we could afford a super-nice pair. For an Embedded C class, [extremerockets] built Listen Up!, a cutoff switch that pauses your music …read more

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This Home-Etched ARM Dev Board Is A Work Of Art

One of the step changes in electronic construction at our level over the last ten or fifteen years has been the availability of cheap high-quality printed circuit boards. What used to cost hundreds of dollars is now essentially an impulse buy, allowing the most intricate of devices to be easily …read more

Continue reading This Home-Etched ARM Dev Board Is A Work Of Art

How a Microcontroller Hiding in a USB Port Became an FPGA Hiding in the Same

When you think of microcontroller development, you probably picture either a breadboard with a chip or a USB-connected circuit board. But Tim Ansell pictured an ARM dev board that is almost completely hidden inside of a USB port. His talk at the 2018 Hackaday Superconference tells that story and then some. Check out the newly published video, along with more details of the talk, after the break.

Tim is the creator of Tomu, the tiny ARM Cortex M0+ board that we first covered back in January. The board has a Silicon Labs EMF32 on one side, four traces to interface …read more

Continue reading How a Microcontroller Hiding in a USB Port Became an FPGA Hiding in the Same